New RDA Central West Skills Occupation List

RDA Central West has developed a list of eligible occupations for the 489 Program and in accordance with the State partnership can select and nominate candidates with the required skills and eligibility as listed in the Central West Skills Occupation List for the Skilled Regional (Provisional) Visa subclass 489.

Full-time considered 35 hours per week. Due consideration has been given to visa work

restrictions therefore 20 hours per week as a minimum will be accepted with two years paid
employment in the occupation.

http://www.rdacentralwest.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/RDA-Central-West-Skills-Occupation-List.pdf

A new immigration idiot emerges

If you want a textbook example of how Australian academia has lost its credibility, look no further than the below analysis from University of Western Sydney Economics Professor Raja Junankar in The Conversation:

Many who fear Australia’s population boom believe we should be cutting down on immigration. They blame immigration for congestion and expenditure of environmental and other vital resources. They say Australia’s cities are becoming overcrowded and cannot sustain more people.

But if Australia were to cut down on immigration, it would also then make sense to introduce policies that limit numbers of international tourists and students. Why single out one group of people? If any person living in Australia drains a certain amount of resources, it stands to reason this is also the case with short-term visitors arriving year after year.

Not only do tourists and international students add to crowded trains, trams and buses, think of all the environmental resources they consume – such as the water hotels spend on frequently washing their sheets.

Just as with migration, tourist numbers are on the rise in Australia. But to come from an economics professor and to be published in The Conversation (a supposedly august, pro-mass immigration academic portal) is an indicator of how biased and desperate the population apologists have become.

First, international tourists typically stay in Australia for a few weeks and then leave, whereas permanent settlers stay, have children, and add to Australia’s population base. Tourists also don’t use public services like health. To compare one group with the other is ridiculous.

Second, the Professor has only looked at short-term arrivals, not net short-term movements (which includes Aussies overseas). If he had done this, he would quickly have discovered that while short-term arrivals have boomed to 9 million people annually, so too has short-term departures of Australians (11 million):

Therefore, the fundamental driver of Australia’s population increase is permanent migrants. Again, they stay in the country and also have children (then captured as ‘natural increase’). Thus, permanent migrants continually add to Australia’s population base both directly and indirectly.

If the permanent migrant intake was hypothetically reduced to zero then, over time, NOM and by extension Australia’s population would barely increase (because all temporaries would have to go home)

SkillSelect Update –

SkillSelect Update
The Department of Home Affairs has just released their first Skill Select Invitation Round data for the new migration year 2018/2019. Among this is advice that subclass 189 and 489 family sponsored invitations will be issued once on the 11th of each month. This is a change from last year when invitations were issued every two weeks.
Invitation numbers have increased
In good news, Invitations for 189 occupations have increased by almost 40 percent from 600 places per month to 1000 places per month.
Point scores for non pro-rata occupations have decreased
The points score for non-pro rata 189 has also decreased to 70 points, down from 75 points at the end of last program year.
A person who has lodged an Expression of Interest for a 189 non pro-rata occupation can expect to wait approximately 4 months for an invitation if they have reached 70 points.

489 Family Sponsored visas
There is no change to 489 family sponsored applications.
Invitations for this subclass remain at 10 per month, requiring a point score of 80.

Most of the pro-rata occupations were invited in less than 4 weeks. It is possible these scores may drop in the upcoming rounds. We will be able to better gauge trends in the next few months.

Pass mark increased
The pass mark for all applicants increased from 60 to 65 on 1 July 2018.
That means that people who do not have a minimum point score of 65 points will not be considered for the 189, 190 or 489.

What options do you have if you have not reached the points score required?
State and Regional Sponsorship
State sponsorship is an exciting option for many clients who have not been able to reach the point score for occupations under the 189 pathway.

More occupation choices

While applicants for the 189 must have an occupation on the MLTSSL, states and regions may be able to sponsor for MLTSSL, STSOL and ROL occupations. This means that there may be a greater opportunity for a migration pathway by seeking state or territory sponsorship.

What is the point score for 190 and 489 regional?
The point score for most states and regions is still 65, including either:

5 points for state sponsorship
10 points for regional sponsorship
Some states such as Victoria and NSW places are competitive for some occupations and a higher point score may be required.
Other ways to increase your points
Additional points many be awarded in a number of ways including, but not limited, to:
Increasing your level of English
Higher education in Australia or overseas
Years of work experience in Australia or overseas
NAATI
Professional Year
Partner points

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