doudoune canada goose canada goose pas cher canada goose femme ugg bottes pas cher uggs pas cher uggs bottes
bottes ugg ugg pas cher ugg soldes ugg france uggs pas cher canada goose pas cher canada goose praka doudoune canada goose doudoune moncler femme moncler pas cher doudoune moncler doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler homme
uggs pas cher moncler pas cher canada goose pas cher canada goose the north face canada goose parka doudoune moncler pas cher ugg bottes pas cher uggs bottes

FAQ

The Australian Government has decided on a major reform in the way Australia selects skilled migrants, the Skilled Migrant Selection Model (the Model). The Model will build upon and draw together the suite of reforms to the skilled migration program over the past three years to deliver the skills Australia needs. The Model will be an electronic system based upon a two-stage process. Prospective applicants will first submit claims for skilled migration by an online EOI and subsequently be invited to make a visa application if they have the skills and qualifications needed in the Australian labour market. This is a significant change from the current situation, as applicants for independent, family or state/territory sponsored migration will be required to receive an invitation in order to lodge a visa application. Once invited, the Model will ensure a match between the number of applicants and the number of available program places. This will result in streamlined processing times.
An EOI is an online expression of interest for skilled migration to Australia. It is how prospective applicants will register their interest in applying for a skilled visa. Prospective applicants would provide basic biographical and other information such as occupation, details of work experience and level of English language ability on the online EOI form. Those expressing interest in independent, family sponsored and/or state/territory sponsored skilled migration would need to submit their claims against the points test. Prospective applicants submitting an EOI are able to indicate whether they want to be considered for independent/family, state/territory and/or employer sponsored migration (on either a temporary or permanent basis). A prospective applicant may register interest in one or more visa program depending on their eligibility and personal preferences.
Stage one Prospective applicants express their interest in applying for a skilled visa through an online EOI form. They will be required to indicate categories of skilled migration they are interested in. These details would be stored in a database, which would be accessible by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (the department). State and territory governmentsand approved employers will only be able to access the details of those who have nominated interest in those respective migration categories.
It is proposed that all prospective skilled migrants seeking an independent, family sponsored or state/territory sponsored visa will need to submit an EOI and be issued with an invitation in order to lodge a visa application. Prospective skilled migrants seeking employer sponsored visas may want to submit an EOI if they have not yet found an employer to sponsor them. This is not a mandatory requirement if they already have an employer sponsor. The following table provides a summary:
Any prospective skilled migrant would be able to submit an EOI provided that, at the time of submission of the EOI, they believe they meet the necessary visa requirements. An applicant must meet certain requirements including the minimum pass mark under the points test to receive an invitation to apply for an independent or family or state/territory sponsored visa. If invited to apply for a visa, an applicant must either be outside Australia, or be lawfully in Australia to make a valid application. Could I submit an EOI in Australia? What requirements would I have to meet? An EOI may be submitted at anytime from anywhere in the world. However, if submitting an EOI in Australia it is important to note that: • the EOI is not a visa application, and you would not be granted a bridging visa • if you are invited to lodge an application you must meet the requirements to be granted a visa • one of these requirements is that you must be lawfully in Australia.
Expressions of Interest would be submitted online through the department’s website. Would I
No, submission of the mandatory details requested in the EOI would be sufficient to express your interest. The EOI is comprised of objective criteria such as English language ability, age and years of skilled work experience
No. Under the Model, it is intended that all EOIs and any subsequent visa applications will only be made electronically.
As part of the EOI process, all prospective skilled migrants would be asked to select the skilled visas they are interested in. By expressing interest in either a state/territory or employer sponsored visa, prospective applicants would be consenting to state/territory governments and/or employers accessing their details from the database. Information visible to these parties would be highlighted as part of the EOI form. Applicants who express interest solely in independent or family sponsored migration would have their information visible only to the department.
No. Documents are not required when submitting an EOI. At the point of the EOI process, the claims you would make as part of your EOI would not be verified. If you are invited to lodge an application for a skilled visa, you must upload documents as part of the application process.
If your occupation and circumstances require you to complete the Job Ready Program, you should satisfy this requirement prior to lodging an EOI. It is proposed that you would be required to lodge your visa application within two months of the date of invitation. If you did not lodge a visa application within this time period your invitation would be considered null and void. Your EOI would remain in the database for the remainder of the two years from the date you submitted your EOI and you may be eligible for selection in a subsequent invitation round during this period.
Yes. Your EOI will need to be based upon facts as they stand at the time you express interest in migrating. If you are invited to submit a visa application, it is envisaged that you would have two months to finalise all necessary documentation and to lodge your application. The invitation would expire at the end of two months.
An EOI would generally remain in the database for two years after submission. An EOI would be removed prior to the expiry of this period if a permanent or provisional visa has been granted.
If your circumstances change after lodging your EOI and before you are invited to lodge a visa application, you would be required to update your information in the database. Updates to your skills would ensure that any documentation you submit in respect of a visa application is consistent with the information on the database. This may increase your score on the points test, therefore improving your chance of being issued with an invitation to lodge a visa application. If the details you provide in your visa application do not match those contained in your EOI, you may not be granted a visa even if you meet the threshold criteria.
EOIs for points tested visas would be ranked in accordance with the points achieved on the skilled migration points test, a mechanism that assesses a skilled migrant’s level of human capital by their age, level of qualifications, English language ability and work experience. In this regard, the prescribed pass mark for a points tested visa category will only represent the minimum standard required. This will ensure that the best applicants in each occupation are identified and selected first. More information on the Points Test is available. See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/whats-new.htm To ensure that every EOI has a unique ranking, equally scoring EOIs would be separated by time of submission. Ranking is an objective and automatic process, conducted by the Model system with no intervention by the department’s staff. The ranking would be made on the basis of the information you provide in the EOI. How would
Applicants who submit an EOI would be aware of the points they have claimed on the points test, but would not be able to view their ranking position. The department would however, publish the lowest score of a successful EOI for each occupation after each invitation round. This will provide an indicative benchmark of the attributes needed to be issued an invitation. For example: Construction project manager (ANZSCO 133111): 65 points. EOI submitted 01.09.2012 02:16:57 Project builder (ANZSCO 133112): 65 points. EOI submitted 15.12.2012 14:44:06
The Model will contain a mechanism to ensure the Independent category of the skilled migration program delivers the occupations that are most in need. This mechanism is known as the occupation ceiling. In simple terms, the occupation ceiling is intended to be a limit on how many people could be selected for independent migration from a particular occupation group. Its purpose is to prevent the Independent category being dominated by a narrow range of occupations. Once the limit is reached each year, there would be no further invitations for migration from a particular occupation group. Program places would then be allocated to other occupation groups, even if they are lower scoring.
Independent Skilled Migration For independent and family sponsored skilled migration, all selection decisions would be made electronically, based on the Selection and Invitation diagram below. Selection is an automated process and is based on objective criteria. Departmental staff will not be involved in the selection process.
For independent and family sponsored skilled migration, all selection decisions would be made electronically, based on the ranking and selecting rules. Delegates from state/territory governments decide whether to nominate prospective applicants and would access the database directly to make selections at any time. Prospective applicants then receive an invitation. Employers may contact prospective migrants directly to arrange sponsorship.
After the initial selection round scheduled for January 2013, it is intended that invitations for migration under the points tested visa categories would be issued at regularly scheduled intervals after that. State/territory governments will be required to use the Model to select prospective migrants for provisional or permanent migration as part of State/Territory Migration Plans. Nominations may be issued at any time but invitations to apply for migration would be issued in accordance with the scheduled rounds of invitations to apply. It is proposed that employers may access and search the database to locate and contact skilled workers who may meet their needs. Following this, employers could sponsor skilled workers using the existing processes for temporary and permanent employer sponsored visas. As per the current arrangements, this can take place at any time.
If you are invited to apply for independent or family/state/territory sponsored skilled migration, it is intended that you lodge your application within two months of the date of invitation. If you do not lodge a visa application within this time period your invitation would be considered null and void. Your EOI would remain in the database and you may be eligible for selection in the next or a subsequent invitation round.
If you are in Australia, it is important to note that submitting an EOI or being issued with an invitation to apply will not be grounds for being issued a bridging visa (BV). A BV would only be considered once a valid visa application is actually lodged. Therefore, if the visa you hold is about to expire before you apply for a skilled visa, you would need to apply for another visa if you want to remain in Australia. If you do not meet the requirements for grant of another visa, you would need to depart Australia before your visa expires
Your EOI would remain in the database for potential selection for two years from the date that it was submitted. During this time, you may be selected in a subsequent invitation round. You must update your details if your circumstances change. Additionally, if you have expressed interest in an employer sponsored visa, you may be contacted by an employer directly to discuss sponsorship.
As an EOI is not a visa application, you would not be unable to access merits review by the Migration Review Tribunal. The review process is only afforded to eligible persons whose visa application has been refused or cancelled. For more information regarding merits review, please visit the Migration Review Tribunal website. See: www.mrt-rrt.gov.au/ Following each selection process, details would be published in relation to the score, occupation and date of EOI for the lowest ranked invitations issued for each occupation. This would demonstrate the transparency of the selection process and ensures the decision on who is invited to make a visa application is open and objective with no discretion applied. Should you want to express concerns to the department regarding the selection process, you can access the department’s feedback form. See: www.immi.gov.au/contacts/forms/services/
There is no guarantee that submitting an EOI would result in an invitation to apply for a visa. Prospective applicants are not entitled to reimbursement of any costs incurred in preparing an EOI.
State Migration plans are developed by state or territory governments and include occupations that are in demand in an individual state or territory. Each state migration plan is approved by the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship. State migration plans are currently being developed and are expected to come into effect during the second half of 2010. A notice will be put on the department’s website when plans come into effect.
The new arrangements apply to all visa applications, including those in the final stages of processing. Applications in lower priority groups cannot be processed further until those in higher priority groups are finalised in accordance with the priority processing direction.
If you were granted a Bridging A visa when you applied for your GSM visa you may be able to lodge an application for a Bridging B visa to allow you to travel and return to Australia (within a specified period). A Bridging B visa is generally not issued for longer than three months. You must apply for a Bridging B visa at one of the department’s state or territory offices, not the skilled processing centre which is processing your GSM application. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/contacts/australia/ If you travel on a Bridging B visa, you do not need to contact the department on your return to Australia to apply for another bridging visa unless you have further need to travel outside Australia. Note: If you travel out of Australia on another type of visa, your bridging visa will cease and you will need to apply for another bridging visa if you return to Australia.
Yes, applications for subsequent entrants for provisional GSM visas are exempt from priority processing arrangements. These arrangements apply to the following GSM visas: • Skilled — Regional Sponsored subclass 475 • Skilled — Recognised Graduate subclass 476 • Skilled — Graduate subclass 485 • Skilled — Regional Sponsored subclass 487 • Skilled — Independent Regional subclass 495 • Skilled — Designated Area-sponsored subclass 496
The skilled migration program is designed to be responsive to the current economic climate and the needs of the Australian economy. The new priority processing arrangements complement other recent changes to skilled migration to ensure that the economy gets the skills it needs in a timely manner. Priority processing arrangements are always subject to further change in response to the economic climate and the demand for particular skills in the Australian economy. Priority in the skilled migration program goes to those who can provide the skills Australia most needs, rather than those visa applicants who applied first. The Australian Government is aware that the priority processing arrangements impact on many applicants. These changes to priority processing simplify previous arrangements. Many applicants will find that they are in a higher priority group. Some will have to wait longer for their visas to be processed.
The introduction of the Fraud PIC is aimed to minimise the level of fraud present in visa applications by providing a strong disincentive to those considering submitting false or misleading information in relation to an application (including review). The Fraud criterion will additionally strengthen the department’s ability to refuse applications where applicants have provided any false or misleading information.
The Fraud PIC is comprised of three primary questions: a) Has the applicant provided bogus, false or misleading documents or information during the course of the current application? b) Has the applicant previously provided bogus, false or misleading documents or information in an application for a visa held within the 12 month period immediately before the time of application? c) Has the applicant had a visa refused for failing to meet the fraud criterion within the three year period immediately before the time of application and up until the time of decision? These criteria allow the department to lawfully assess whether or not an application lodged for a visa subclass that is subject to assessment against the Fraud PIC, is subject to fraudulent, misleading or incorrect information and/or bogus documentation.
Yes. Where the department suspects an application contains fraudulent information, the department is required to, by law, invite the applicant to comment on the suspected genuineness of the documentation submitted with their application. This invitation also provides the applicant with the opportunity to demonstrate compelling and/or compassionate reasons as to why the visa should be granted. An applicant will be provided with 28 days to reply. Failure to provide a response to the department within the prescribed timeframe is likely to result in the application being refused.
Compelling and/or compassionate circumstances are limited to either of the following: • compelling circumstances that affect the interests of Australia • compelling or compassionate circumstances that affect the interests of an Australian citizen, an Australian permanent resident or an eligible New Zealand citizen. Where an applicant fails to demonstrate that they meet one of the above criteria, their application may be subject to refusal.
Where an applicant is found to have supplied false, misleading or bogus information and/or documentation to the department, the application will be refused and the applicant will be subject to a three year bar which may prevent the grant of a further visa that is subject to assessment under the Fraud PIC. The three year bar applies only to visas that are subject to assessment against the Fraud PIC.
Yes. The Fraud PIC is a ‘one fails, all fails’ criteria. This means that where an application is refused against the Fraud PIC, everyone included in that application will be refused. This also includes dependent (secondary applicants) who were under 18 years of age at time of application. Case Scenario: Applicant A lodges an application with Applicant B. The visa that Applicant A and Applicant B has applied for, is subject to Fraud PIC assessment. Applicant A or B gives (or causes to be given) false/misleading information to the department in relation to the visa application. Both Applicant A and Applicant B’s visas are refused under Fraud PIC
No. As the non-migrating family member did not make a combined application with the applicant, any future visa in which they want to lodge to enable entry into Australia, under a program in which the Fraud PIC is an assessable criterion, is permissible. Case Scenario: On 01/05/2012, Applicant B lodges a new application as the primary applicant, with Applicant C as secondary applicant, for a visa that is subject to Fraud PIC. As Applicant B is subject to a three year bar due to their previous refusal on the grounds of the giving of false/misleading information), Applicant C must have their current application and visa refused (because they cannot satisfy the “main applicant must be visaed first” secondary criterion.). Applicant B continues to be subject to the bar until 01/05/2014. Applicant C however, is not subject to a three year bar. This is because the bar applies only if a visa is refused due to the giving of false/misleading information or a bogus document, not on the basis of previous refusals of applications made during a bar period (this also prevents the bar period from being reset every time a person makes an application prior to the expiry of the bar period).
An applicant falling into this category will be able to validly lodge an application however, will need to provide evidence to the department demonstrating compelling and/or compassionate reasons as to the following: • why the department should waive the three year bar • why the department should facilitate grant of the visa applied for (should all the legislated criteria for grant be met). Based on a statement of claims to the department addressing the above, an applicant’s request for a waiver will be considered by a delegate of the minister. Should this delegate have any concerns regarding claims made by the applicant, the delegate will contact the applicant to discuss the application further.
Review rights are only afforded where the application is lodged in Australia and where review rights currently exist for applications that are refused. Generally, applications lodged outside Australia that are refused against this criterion will continue to not have access to review rights. In some cases, review rights may lie with a sponsor. Where an application is refused, a decision record will provide the applicant with information regarding their review rights.
On 8 February 2010 the Australian Government announced a series of reforms to the skilled migration program. One of the reforms announced was the development of State Migration Plans. State and territory Migration Plans (Plans) are agreements between individual states and territories with the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship. Plans allow states and territories to nominate General Skilled Migration (GSM) applicants under occupations required to fill skill shortages within their local labour markets. Plans specify which occupations state and territory governments can nominate applicants under and specify the number of visas that will be granted as part of this program
For information about obtaining a nomination you will need to contact the relevant Agency for the state or territory where you intend to settle. Information about contacting these agencies is provided at Q16 below. For GSM applications lodged after 1 July 2010, evidence of nomination approval is required prior to lodging your visa application. Without this prior approval you will not be able to lodge a valid application for a nominated visa. This department will subsequently receive confirmation of your nomination approval from the nominating state or territory government. States and territories have a limited capacity to put forward nominations for occupations not listed on their Plan. If you want to be nominated for an occupation that is not on a state or territory’s Plan you will need to discuss this with the nominating agency before proceeding with your visa application.
Plans provide state and territory governments with flexibility within the Migration Program to address specific skill shortages and local labour market needs. Plans are tailored to the requirements of each state and territory’s jurisdiction. While state and territory governments have had the capacity to nominate applicants for the purposes of the GSM program for a number of years, the introduction of Plans is intended to improve the targeting of this part of the program. Each state and territory has different skill needs and Plans are tailored to the requirements of each jurisdiction. Therefore, occupation lists may differ between each state and territory. November 2010 2 of 4 States and territories can nominate applicants for occupations that are not found on Schedule 3 of the current Skilled Occupation List (SOL) assisting them to address local difficulties in finding workers to fill skill shortages.
The department expects that all Plans will have commenced by the end of the 2010 calendar year, however, Plans for each state and territory will not all commence at the same time.
When Plans are in place, each state and territory will publish the list of eligible occupations on their website. Links for the relevant state and territory agency websites are listed in Q16 below
When a Plan is in place, state and territory governments will publish their list of eligible occupations on their website. Links for the relevant state and territory government websites are listed in Q16 below.
Plans apply to applicants who obtain nomination from a state or territory government and apply for one of the following visas: - Subclass 176 Skilled - Sponsored - Subclass 886 Skilled - Sponsored - Subclass 475 Skilled - Regional - Subclass 487 Skilled - Regional Sponsored
Yes. Ministerial Direction 48 made on 14 July 2010, by the then Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator the Hon Chris Evans, set new priority processing arrangements for certain skilled migration visas. Under this Ministerial Direction the following processing priorities (with the highest priority listed first) apply: 1. Applications from people who are employer sponsored under the Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) and the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS). 2. Applications from people who are nominated by a state or territory government agency with a nominated occupation that is specified on that state or territory’s Migration Plan. 3. Applications from people who have nominated an occupation on the current Skilled Occupation List (SOL) – Schedule 3 in effect from 1 July 2010. November 2010 3 of 4 See: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/new-list-of-occupations.pdf 4. All other applications are to be processed in the order in which they are received. For more information about priority processing you can visit the department’s website. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/updated-priority-processing-arrangements.htm When a state and territory government’s Plan is in place, existing applicants whose nominated occupation is included on the relevant Plan will be processed under processing priority category 2.
No. When your nomination is accepted by this department you do not need to provide any further information as the department will determine your eligibility for priority processing. Applicants will not be eligible for priority processing under a Plan until this department accepts a nomination. If you have already lodged an application with nomination you do not need to provide any further confirmation as nominations, approved before Plans were implemented, remain valid.
Applications for permanent visas lodged before 1 July 2010 Applicants who applied for either a Skilled (Residence) or Skilled (Migrant) visa (subclasses 175, 176, 885 and 886) before 1 July 2010 are able to seek a nomination under a Plan and have their application assessed on the basis of having a state or territory nomination. Applications for permanent visas lodged on or after 1 July 2010 Applicants who applied for either a Skilled (Residence) or Skilled (Migrant) visa (subclasses 175, 176, 885 and 886) on or after 1 July 2010 as either an independent or family sponsored applicant cannot be assessed using a state or territory nomination under a Plan. This is because it is a legislative requirement for applicants applying from 1 July 2010 to have obtained a nomination (or family sponsorship) prior to lodging the visa application. Applications for provisional visas The Migration Regulations have never permitted applicants who applied for a Skilled Sponsored (Regional) visa (subclasses 475 or 487) on the basis of family sponsorship to change their application to a state or territory nominated application and this has not changed.
Applications for GSM visas lodged before 1 July 2010 Applicants who applied for either a Skilled (Residence) or Skilled (Migrant) visa (subclasses 175, 176, 885 and 886) before 1 July 2010 can obtain a further nomination under a Plan and be assessed on the basis of the new nomination. November 2010 4 of 4 Applicants who applied for a Skilled Sponsored (Regional) visa (subclasses 475 or 487) before 1 July 2010 on the basis of a state or territory nomination can obtain a further nomination under a Plan and be assessed on the basis of the new nomination. Applications for GSM visas lodged on or after 1 July 2010 Applicants for GSM visas who applied on or after 1 July 2010 cannot use a nomination from another state or territory for their existing application.
If you applied for your visa before the relevant Plan commenced, and your occupation is not on that Plan your nomination continues to be valid, however, your application will not receive priority processing (category 2) under a Plan This means that your application will retain its existing processing priority under Ministerial Direction 48 (see Q7 for priority processing information).
The options available to you are: • continue to await a decision on your visa application or • assess your eligibility for an employer sponsored visa. For more information about priority processing you can visit the department’s website. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/updated-priority-processing-arrangements.htm
If you are outside Australia. Telephone: + 61 1300 735 683 If you are in Australia. Telephone: 1300 735 683 Monday to Friday 9 am to 4 pm (Central Australian Time).
You can contact the relevant state and territory governments through their websites which are listed are listed under contact details of the fact sheet. See: State Migration Plans Fact Sheet
If you are applying for either a Subclass 487, 885 or 886 visa on or after 1 January 2010, you will need to have obtained a suitable skills assessment in order to lodge a valid visa application. More information on how to obtain a skills assessment is available on the department’s website. See: Australian Skills Recognition Information (ASRI)
It is now a requirement that an applicant has a suitable skills assessment in order to be able to lodge a valid application for specified onshore GSM visas. This change has been made to ensure that applicants seeking to migrate to Australia have the necessary skills to perform in the occupation they have nominated and can successfully compete for work in their field. Requiring an applicant to already have a suitable skills assessment before applying will also bring the requirement in line with offshore GSM visas where a suitable skills assessment outcome is required at time of application.
If you do not receive a positive skills assessment for the occupation you have nominated for migration, you will not be able to lodge a valid application if you intend on applying for either a Subclass 487, 885 or 886 visa. You should contact the department as soon as you are aware that you have not been issued with a suitable skills assessment by the relevant assessing authority to discuss your options and ensure that you remain lawfully in Australia. The department can be contacted on 1300 364 613 or online. See: Contact Us If you have any questions regarding the skills assessment outcome, you should contact the relevant assessing authority to discuss them. These details are available on the department’s website. See: Australian Skills Recognition Information (ASRI)
If you are intending to apply to migrate to Australia, you should apply for a skills assessment as soon as you are able to do so. You should contact the relevant assessing authority well in advance of your intended application date to determine what is required, that you are eligible to apply and how long the assessment will take. If it looks like you are unable to obtain a suitable skills assessment outcome before your current visa expires, you should contact the department as soon as possible to discuss your options and to ensure that you remain lawfully in Australia. Options that may be available to you include finding an alternative visa option to remain lawfully in Australia or departing Australia and applying through the offshore GSM streams. The department can be contacted on 1300 364 613 or online. See: Contact Us
No. From 1 January 2010, unless you have obtained a positive skills assessment from the relevant assessing authority in your nominated occupation, you are not able to apply for a GSM visa. If you do seek to apply, your application will be invalid and returned to you. A decision on your application will not be made by the department. This requirement applies to all applications for an onshore GSM visa (excluding subclass 485 and 887 visas).
If the department has returned your application as it is not valid, you should contact the department as soon as possible to discuss your options and to ensure that you remain lawfully in Australia. Possible options the department may discuss with you, depending on your individual circumstances include: • making a valid GSM application after you have obtained a suitable skills assessment • seeking an alternative visa option if you are unable to meet the requirements of lodging a valid GSM visa application • departing Australia. The department can be contacted on 1300 364 613 or online. See: Contact Us
The above changes to the skills assessment validity requirements only affect Subclass 487, 885 and 886 visas - your Subclass 485 visa application is not affected. You are still able to demonstrate at time of application that you have either applied for or have already received a suitable skills assessment from the relevant assessing authority
The new Skilled Occupations List (SOL) will take effect from 1 July 2010. The new list is specific to the general skilled migration (GSM) program and does not apply to employer-sponsored permanent or temporary visas. The list is available on the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s (DIAC) website. See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/whats-new.htm The new list (based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, or ANZSCO) identifies occupations that reflect the high value, nation building skills Australia needs – skills that take time and diligence to acquire, that are put to the use intended, and where the cost to the economy and local communities of the skill being in short supply is great. Is there a specific contact number that I can use to find out more about the changes? The department is operating a dedicated phone line to respond to any queries on the new list of occupations. Telephone: 1300 735 683
The new list of occupations will be updated annually, and will change in accordance with the needs of the Australian labour market. While the new list would be expected to stay relatively stable, there is no guarantee how long a particular occupation may remain on it.
The new list will apply to all new GSM applications made from 1 July 2010
Yes. A number of transitional arrangements have been introduced to minimise the impact of this change on international students. The new list of occupations will not apply to any valid GSM applications already lodged before 1 July 2010. It will also not apply to people who, on 8 February 2010: • held a subclass 485 (skilled graduate) visa or • had a pending subclass 485 visa application and who apply for a provisional or permanent onshore GSM visa on or before 31 December 2012. Further, the new list of occupations will not apply to international students who, on 8 February 2010 held: • a subclass 572 (vocational education and training sector) visa; • a subclass 573 (higher education sector) visa; or • a subclass 574 (postgraduate research sector) visa. when they apply for a subclass 485 (skilled graduate) visa on or before 31 December 2012. This will enable these students to remain in Australia for 18 months on the temporary skilled graduate visa after the completion of their studies to gain valuable work experience and the opportunity to secure an employer or state/territory government to sponsor them. See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/whats-new.htm
Are there alternative pathways to migration for people who do not have skills that qualify them for an occupation that is on the new list of occupations?
Any pending GSM visa applications lodged before the new list of occupations comes into effect on 1 July 2010 will not be affected by this change.
No. You will not be eligible to apply for a permanent GSM visa unless your nominated occupation is on the SOL that is in effect at the time you seek to lodge your application. Transitional arrangements will only apply to you if you submit an application for a subclass 485 skilled graduate visa on or before 31 December 2012. Up until 31 December 2012, you will still be able to apply for a subclass 485 skilled graduate visa, if your occupation is on the old SOL.
No. You will have to nominate an occupation on the SOL that is in effect at the time you seek to lodge your application
If you are unable to obtain a visa to allow you to remain in Australia, you are required to depart. People who are not eligible for independent migration may be eligible to apply for migration in other visa categories. See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/whats-new.htm
Information on the relevant skills assessing authorities is available on the department’s website: See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/sol
SkillSelect is a new approach to skilled migration. SkillSelect is a web based interface that enables skilled workers interested in migrating to Australia to record their details to be considered for a skilled visa through an Expression of Interest (EOI). Intending migrants could be found and nominated for skilled visas by Australian employers or state and territory governments, or they could be invited by the Australian Government to lodge a visa application. This will give the government greater control and flexibility to adjust to changes in the economy
SkillSelect will be optional for permanent employer-sponsored visa applicants. However, if you do not have an employer to sponsor you for skilled migration to Australia, then SkillSelect allows you to register an Expression of Interest (EOI) for skilled migration and permanent residence in Australia. If you have pre-arranged an employer to nominate you to work in Australia, then it is not necessary for you to also register an EOI in SkillSelect.
If you are having technical difficulties accessing or using SkillSelect, you can access the SkillSelect Support page using the ‘SkillSelect Support’ button on this website. The SkillSelect Support page will provide detailed information including SkillSelect user guides, technical FAQs and video tutorials to help you use SkillSelect. You will be able to submit an online enquiry requesting resolution of a technical issue with your SkillSelect account or EOI. Your enquiry will then be escalated to the correct area for resolution. The department’s client contact centres will be unable to help with technical enquiries about SkillSelect.
A points test pass mark exists for the points tested skilled migration visas and the business innovation and investment visa. The points tested skilled migration visas - subclasses 189, 190 and 489 have a points test pass mark of 60 points.
This will depend on your visa preference(s). As part of the EOI process, you will be asked to select the skilled visa(s) you are interested in submitting an EOI for. You can express interest in one or more visa(s). If you choose to be considered for a state or territory or employer sponsored visa, you are agreeing to allow state or territory governments and/or employers to access your details in SkillSelect. Employers are not able to view any identifying information such as your name, date of birth, gender, or nationality. Employers can only access information that will help them to consider you for employment; this could include your occupation, your work experience, and your level of English ability. If you express interest for only the independent or family sponsored visas, the information recorded in your EOI will only be available to the department.
From 1 July 2013, new visa pricing arrangements were introduced, changing visa application charges from a single charge at the time of application to a charge per applicant in an individual or combined application.
The decision to introduce new visa pricing arrangements was based on a review of Australia's existing visa pricing structure that had not been modified since 1994. The pricing restructure brings Australia's visa pricing in line with similar countries such as Canada, the United States of America and the United Kingdom.
The charges apply to most visa subclasses. From 1 July 2013, the charges that apply for a visa are determined by: the number of applicants in a combined application the age of the individuals included in a combined application the method used to apply for an application (by the Internet or non-Internet) the physical location of the applicant at the time of making the application (in Australia or outside Australia) the applicant's temporary visa history.
You can determine the total charge of your visa using the pricing tools available at fees and charges. You can look up all charges associated with your visa and determine the total relevant to your application. Calculation sheets are available in all relevant application forms for paper applications. When you lodge your visa application online through our online service, the online application tool will calculate the total charges for you.
The Visa Wizard and the Visa Pricing Table are tools you can use to assist you in determining the total charge of your visa application. You can also get an estimate of your visa application charge by using the Visa Pricing Estimator.
Yes. The new visa pricing arrangements apply to all visa applications and all applicants included in a combined visa application, from 1 July 2013.
There have been a number of recent changes to Australian visas. For information on what visa subclasses you can apply for
The additional applicant charge is applied to each additional visa applicant where there is more than one visa applicant in a combined visa application.
All applicants added to an application for a visa that must pay the additional applicant charge, if it is applicable to that visa subclass. Please check the Visa Pricing Table to see what the additional applicant charge is for your visa application
All additional applicants added to a visa application must pay an additional application charge, if specified for that visa. Application charges are usually not refundable, even if an applicant is withdrawn or replaced with someone else.
When you are lodging an application online, you will only be able to see a total amount as you complete the application. A breakdown of the charges will be displayed on the receipt once you have completed paying and lodging your application. If you would like to reassure yourself that the amount is correct, you can use the Visa Pricing Table to calculate the amount that you need to pay.
If you do not have sufficient funds you will not be able to complete the visa application. You must contact your bank to ensure that you have enough funds available to pay the required charges. We suggest that you save your application data so that you can reuse this information when you are able to make full payment.
A form that is printed from our website is not an electronic form. Electronic lodgement refers to a form lodged online through our online service. Refer to the Online Services section to see if your visa can be applied for online
The additional money requested by us will need to be paid before the visa can be processed. It can be paid in Australia by your relative, or by you outside Australia.
You need to pay the full visa application charge in order to lodge a valid visa application. It is important to be aware of the expiry date of your student visa as you must either depart Australia before it expires, or lodge a new visa application. If your visa does expire, you need to contact the department immediately through the Community Status Resolution Service. If your visa has been expired for more than 28 days, an exclusion period may be imposed which means you cannot return to Australia for three years.
The information previously contained on form 990i has been replaced with the Visa Pricing Table. Previous versions of Visa Pricing Table